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I-88 should reopen by mid-September and other news

NYSDOT officials expect a mid-September completion on the emergency replacement of a culvert that washed out during the floods in late-June. Two truck drivers, David Swingle of Waverly, NY and Patrick L. O'Connell of Lisbon, ME, were killed when the culvert and I-88 collapsed beneath them. Repair crews began work on July 2nd and teams in two shifts have worked 24/7 on the emergency project. The scheduled re-opening of I-88 is tentative based on future weather conditions. [WSTM]

Ironically this past June, a contract for reinforcement and repairs to the soon to be washed out culvert was let. The award was granted only a few weeks befort the flood and collapse of the culvert. The repair project would have begun this summer. [WBNG-TV]

Also, a slight increase in wrecks, about one extra every other day, has occurred in the area (on NY 7 & 8) as a result of the I-88 detour route. Most are minor fender benders. [Oneonta Daily Star]

Comments

I was out that way the day after we did our VT run. There appears also to be some damage in spots extending to the WB rest area east of junction 11. The freeway is narrowed down to 2 lanes from that point west to j10-alternating carriageways. I went along the NY 7 detour, which worked well enough on a quiet Sunday morning; and turned with NY 8 so i could catch a bit of that road. My Ex lives in Hancock(ewww), so I took NY 8 to the end and went on over for a free breakfast.
Becky said…
So nice to see that they knew the culvert was bad and yet Jennifer Post of NYDOT and Governor George Pataki are saying was an act of god. Act of god my ass they knew it was bad so why didn't they fix it sooner. Then maybe my brother in law Patrick O'Connell and David Swingle would still be alive.

Becky
Doug said…
There were a few articles in today's Albany Times Union regarding this issue. Shortened the corresponding URLs for ease of use...

http://tinyurl.com/m7v9e
http://tinyurl.com/mddr8
http://tinyurl.com/nd825
Becky said…
Thank you Doug, Kate Gurnett had contacted us for an interview and I was on the look out for these articles. They were written well, but still I have some heartburn with what is being said about "act of god". Maybe Ms Post and Governor Pataki need to sit at home states away for 11 days wondering what has happened to their only sibling is he alive or dead? Will they ever find a body? Then and only then can the say to me it was an act of god.
Anonymous said…
Act of god they say well i say it was an act of god too put two people like Patrick O'Connell and my dear uncle david the two of them where out doing there jobs as they do every day my uncle was so dedicated to hes work that even if there was the chance of him not going he would of went, there are many times that a trucker would get sick and call in well my uncle didnt unless he was dead on his feat. so the only thing that god has to do with anything is that he is now taking care of mine and beckys family that we have lost!

anthony

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