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Christmas Eve PA Trip

On Christmas Eve, I took a small trip through Washington and western Allegheny Counties to enjoy some freetime.

Route: PA 48, PA 51, Former PA 171, PA 201, I-70, PA 519, PA 980, US 22, PA TPK 576, US 22, PA 980, PA 50, PA 519, I-70, PA 201, Former PA 171, PA 51, PA 48.

Notes: Traffic was pretty light on I-70, Next to no traffic on PA TPK 576. PA 980 has a series of turns in the towns of Canonsburg and McDonald.

Accomplishments: PA 519, 980 and TPK 576 clinched. New Miles on PA 50.

Photos:

Just South ("East") of the US 30 (Exit 2) interchange. PA TPK 576 shields are green on white with White on Green directional banners.


The current end of PA TPK 576 east is at US 22 near Bavington. I am standing inside what one day will be the lanes that will carry PA TPK 576 over US 22.

Just a zoom image from the same spot above this time of the exit gore and the Exit 6 ramps. (I could have zoomed further here.)

A Keystone Town Marker for Hickory. It's about time I start contributing to my own project.

Finally, the first South PA 519 shield at the Northern Terminus of the route in Hickory.

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