Skip to main content

Cinco de Mayo New England Trip

Yesterday, I decided to take a roadtrip around some of the neighboring New England states, particularly Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. The weather was fantastic in order to take the opportunity to go, mid 60s and sunny. One of my favorite times of year to visit New England is during the spring, when plant life and people begin to wake up from their winterlong slumber.

Route (from Albany, NY and back): I-787, NY 787, NY 32, US 4, NY 142, NY 40, NY 67, NY 22, NY 313, VT 313, VT 7A, Kelly Stand Rd., VT 100, VT 30, VT 35, VT 103, VT 100, US 4, VT 12, US 5, US 4, NH 127, NH 132, US 3, NH 11A, NH 107, US 3, NH 11B, NH 11, US 3, NH 106, I-393, I-93, I-89, NH 13, MA 13, MA 119, MA 111, MA 2, I-190, MA 140, MA 62, MA 31, MA 122A, MA 122, MA 148, MA 67, MA 19, CT 19, CT 319, CT 190, US 5, I-91, I-90, Berkshire Spur, I-87, I-787

Notes:

Clinched US 4 from end-to-end, finally. I was missing a few sections in New Hampshire, between NH 104 and NH 127. NH 13, MA 13, MA 19, CT 19 and CT 319 were also clinched. I had originally though that I had clinched NH 11B, but a later check indicates that the eastern end of the route is at NH 11A as opposed to NH 11, like I had originally thought.

Also clinched the Towns of Somerset and Brookline in Vermont, as part of my Vermont 251 quest.

US 4 in New Hampshire is also known as the Purple Heart Trail. I do not believe that the same distinction carries over into US 4's mileage in Vermont and New York State.

There was construction on I-91 in Springfield, Massachusetts, near the MA 83 exit. This was on I-91 northbound where the northbound lanes narrow from three to two lanes. But there were horizontally striped pavement markings, which I do not recall being there in the past.

Yesterday, May 5, 2007, was the annual Green Up Day in Vermont. It is always the first Saturday in May, and I saw a good number of people picking up trash along the roads in Vermont, in order to help Vermont look nicer. You can go to Green Up Vermont for more information.

Cheapest gas I saw was in Laconia, New Hampshire, for $2.769 a gallon for regular unleaded. I cannot remember the name of the gas station, sorry. Most expensive gas was in Connecticut, along CT 190, for $3.199 a gallon. This distinction was shared by a number of gas stations. Cheapest gas I got was at an Irving station on NH 127 in Sanbornton for $2.799.

The Eagleville Covered Bridge over the Batten Kill in Washington County, near Shushan, New York, is currently getting a face lift. Renovations are being done, and it now has a coat of red paint, similar to what happened a few years ago when the Buskirk Covered Bridge over the Hoosic River was renovated.

One of a few signs telling you not to take Kelly Stand Road in the winter. The Town of Sunderland, Vermont, does not maintain the road in winter, which is a rutted dirt road. There were a few makeshift fishing camps and even pockets of snow along the road, even in May.

Okemo Mountain and the town of Ludlow as seen from VT 103.

What appears to be a double truss bridge over the Ottauquechee River in Woodstock. I believe the green part of the bridge came first, and the arched truss came later in support.

I went looking for lunch in Lebanon, New Hampshire. Didn't quite find something there to satisfy my hunger, but I did walk around the town green and got this nice snap of the city hall. Later in the trip, I also walked around the town green of Milford, New Hampshire.

The birthplace of Daniel Webster, which is located off of NH 127 near Franklin. On these long day trips, I do like to visit some attractions that are off the beaten path, in the hopes that I may learn about something I otherwise would have not learned about. Daniel Webster did a lot in his life, as he was a lawyer and a statesman, which was far beyond the reach of the little house that he was born in.

Probably my find of the trip as far as signs and shields go, an old NH 106 shield on NH 11A in Laconia. I do know that NH used square shields at one time, but I was unaware that the state initials were also included on the shield itself. Other interesting route markers that I saw was an inverted (white numbering on a black background) NH 127 shield in Franklin, and two uni-signs with green-on-white NH 13 and NH 114 shields included in Goffstown.


Endicott Rock, which is located at the outlet for Lake Winnipesaukee in Weirs Beach. Endicott Rock once marked the northern boundary for the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

Lake Winnipesaukee, as seen from Weirs Beach.

Weirs Beach itself has a summer destination feel to it, quite like Lake George here in Upstate New York.

Eagle Hall, at the town green in Milford, New Hampshire. This was the first town meeting house in Milford, and is now a bakery.

Johnny Appleseed statue at the MA 2 rest area in Leominster, Mass. Johnny Appleseed was born in Leominster, and the town honors his legacy as an American folk hero.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Relief Route That Wasn't: The Never Built I-70 Bypass in the Mid-Mon Valley

In June 1963, a small blurb in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette read that The Westmoreland Engineering Company was awarded a $24,060 bid to study the proposed construction of Interstate 70 in Westmoreland and Washington Counties.  The study was to see what the construction and right-of-way costs "...to modernize the existing highway to Interstate requirements within eight months." (1)  This small, non-attributed, three paragraph article came less than a decade after the completion of a four lane highway that linked the Mid-Mon Valley to the Pennsylvania Turnpike. This would be the start of a 15 year process to upgrade and improve Interstate 70 - a process that ultimately never produced a single foot of new highway.

This is the story, albeit brief, of the I-70 that never came about.

Background:
What is now known as Interstate70 from Washington to New Stanton began as a connecting highway for the region to the Pennsylvania Turnpike.  Known as the "Express Highway", construct…

A look at Pittsburgh's Saw Mill Run Boulevard

Saw Mill Run Boulevard - Pennsylvania State Route 51 - runs through the narrow Saw Mill Run Valley.  It begins at the intersection of Clairton Road and Provost Road at the City of Pittsburgh Line with Brentwood.  It ends at the West End Circle at the entrance to the West End Bridge.  A four lane highway for its the entire length, Saw Mill Run Boulevard consists of interchanges at the South Portal of the Liberty Tubes and with the Parkway West.  It is an expressway from the Parkway to the West End Circle (West End Bypass).  One of the most well known traffic tie-ups in the Pittsburgh area occurs between Maytide Street and PA 88 (Library Road) which is simply known as 'Maytide and 88.'

History:
Saw Mill Run Boulevard was part of the 1928 Allegheny County 'City Beautiful' bond issue.  The bonds resulted in the creation of Saw Mill Run, Ohio River, Allegheny River and Mosside Boulevards. (1)   After the completion of the Liberty Tunnels in 1924, Downtown Pittsburgh was offic…

The Many Failed Plans of Pittsburgh's Wabash Bridge and Tunnel

The December 27, 2004 opening of the Wabash Tunnel ended over 70 years of proposals and speculation for the use of the over 100 year old facility.  The tunnel, which is now a reversible roadway that is an alternative route for rush hour traffic, saw many failed plans during the 20th Century.  These plans included options for mass transit, converted and new bridges for vehicles, and other forms of transportation.

Brief History:
Constructed in 1902-04, the Wabash Bridge and Tunnel was planned and financed by rail mogul, Jay Gould.  Gould began his "Battle of the Wabash" with the established railroads of the city in 1890.  He would finally emerge victorious, but during that struggle, Gould would see many setbacks that would eventually result in the railroad's bankruptcy in 1908.  On October 19, 1903, when the two ends of the bridge were to be joined together over the Monongahela River, the 109' bridge collapsed; killing ten men.  Construction would resume four days later …