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NYC Congestion Pricing

Recently, the plan for congestion pricing in New York City, specifically within the Borough of Manhattan, was approved by the New York City Council.  Congestion pricing would charge most drivers $8 for the privilege to drive south of 60th St. between 6am and 6pm during the weekdays.  Trucks, taxis and other vehicles may pay different rates, and there are a number of exemptions as well.  The congesting pricing plan is meant to encourage the use of mass transit.

But of course, as things tend to happen in New York State, this plan must be approved by the New York State Legislature in order for the City to get $354 million in federal grants that would used in order to finance congestion pricing.  However, with several state legislators based in downstate New York in opposition to the plan, getting congestion pricing through may be easier said than done.

The state legislature has a deadline of midnight on Monday, April 7, 2008 to approve the congestion pricing plan.  Governor David Paterson, who is said to approve of congestion pricing, has called for the legislature to work on the state budget (which has since passed the annual due date of April 1st) for the weekend, which may hurt the chances of the plan being passed.  If the plan is approved, New York City would be the first city in the United States to have congestion pricing.

I support congestion pricing in New York City, as well as other cities, but I believe the plan is not ambitious enough.  The original plan called for congestion pricing south of 96th St. in Manhattan, which would have worked out well.  Also, if congestion pricing does take effect in New York City, and is proven to be successful, watch for congestion pricing to be implemented in other cities, such as Boston and Washington.

http://tinyurl.com/6kh2wj - Albany Times Union article (4/5/08, via the AP)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_congestion_pricing - Wikipedia

Comments

Anonymous said…
Congestion pricing is absolutely wrong and immoral, especially in NY City, where Manhattan connects LI to the mainland of the USA. The Bronx ans Staten Island already have enough traffic carrying vehicles in/out of LI. Eithe way, it is wrong.

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