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NCTA unveils 'Option B' for Mid-Currituck Bridge

Remember a few months ago, when I blogged about that the NCTA was studying a possible new option for the Mid-Currituck Bridge that would save $60 million in cost?

Well, this past week the NCTA unveiled those plans as 'Option B'. Needless to say, some residents were not enthused with 'Option B'.

As previously mentioned part of Option B would consist of a new location for the tollbooth. The other part of Option B, and the part that left a strong distaste in the mouth of Currituck County Commissioner Barry Nelms, is to relocate and eliminate most Aydlett Road.

The toll booths and Aydlett Road are on the mainland side of the bridge.

Aydlett Road traffic would be moved onto the new road.

Part of the reasoning for the new option are environmental concerns, specifically Maple Swamp. According to NCTA Engineer Jennifer Harris, "Aydlett Road is essentially a dam in between two parts of Maple Swamp — it keeps the swamp from being a continuous natural feature."

Commissioner Nelms along with a few residents voiced their opposition to the new option.

"You are obviously catering to the environmentalists by moving [Aydlett] road. To move it to their immediate neighborhood is going to take out the stars they see at night forever and that’s not acceptable to the residents of Aydlett,” Nelms said.

A finalized route for the Mid-Currituck Bridge has yet to be determined.

Story Link:
New Currituck bridge option unveiled ---The Daily Advance

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