Skip to main content

First Roadtrip of 2010

Not only was this the first roadtrip of 2010, this was also my first use of twitter on trips. I had been discussing with a few folks the idea of using twitter to post real time information from noteworthy to obscure on roadtrips. We'll see how it goes. If you'd like to follow us on twitter, here's the link.

To see the entire trip on flickr (over 100 photos) head here.

For the roadtrip, Brian LeBlanc and Joe Babyak joined me and we met up in Kinston to explore areas of Eastern NC. The deciding factor for starting at Kinston was that North Carolina's newest state route, NC 148, was just recently created nearby.

And it is indeed signed.

IMG_3224

NC 148 follows the CF Harvey Parkway from US 258 eastwards to NC 58 north of Kinston. In a nutshell, it's the main road through the Global Transpark. The highway is being extended westward to US 70.

Prior to checking out NC 148, we walked around Kinston. It was a cold, blustery day and the temperature barely got above freezing. But we braved the cold and the wind long enough to chek out the city.

Kinston's Business District had a number of older storefronts, and in a sign of things to come, a handful of older neon signs.

IMG_3216

The GE Appliance Center may be long gone. But fortunately, the old neon sign is still there. One of the things I like the most about downtowns are the old storefronts. Specifically, the floor marquee's at the entrances to the retail establishment.

IMG_3208

There are a lot of other great things in Kinston. This old service station stands at the corner of Caswell and McLewean Streets.

IMG_3221

From Kinston, it was up NC 58 towards Wilson. On the way, we made a few stops. First, at the southern end of NC 123 and NC 58 were a pair of abandoned farm buildings. With the cold, crisp winter setting these make great photo opportunities.

IMG_3229

IMG_3238

Up the road on NC 58 was the town of Stantonsburg. The town is off of NC 58 on NC 111/222. It's a very small downtown, but there are a lot of unique little finds at this town.

IMG_3250

First, an embossed No Parking sign:

IMG_3247

And continuing with the neon signs theme of the day - one for Stantonsburg Drug.

IMG_3249

On the other side of the railroad tracks was an abandoned Pure Station.

IMG_3253

I found the remains of an old 'Closed Sundays' sticker interesting.

IMG_3259

We arrived in Wilson and were hungry for lunch. Joe commented, "First fast food place we find, we eat." We lucked out. On US 264 Alternate (Ward Blvd.) we stopped at Burger Boy for lunch.

Burger Boy wishes you the very best in 2010

And it wasn't that bad. Everyone enjoyed their burgers and the place for a cold Saturday was rather busy.

From Wilson, it was down US 117 towards Goldsboro. We were in Dixie; albeit briefly.

Dixie-2

South on US 117 from Dixie is the town of Fremont. Though the town is more known for its daffodils, Fremont may want to add old Pepsi and Coca-Cola billboards to their list of attractions.

IMG_3276

IMG_3282

IMG_3288

On the eastern edge of downtown is a great old abandoned feed mill.

IMG_3296

IMG_3298

From there it was the final stop of the trip - Goldsboro. It was my first time in downtown Goldsboro. Unfortunately, the wind (and the cold) increased throughout the day and it impacted the time we could have had to explore. However, there are a lot great possibilities there for future visits.

IMG_3300

IMG_3304

The shoe store is still operating. I'd love to see the neon sign lit up at night. It's something you don't see in many downtown's anymore.

IMG_3309

IMG_3311

From there it was down NC 111 and the east on NC 55 back to Kinston.

I did gain some new mileage on the trip. First, I clinched the business routes for US 70 in Kinston (w/US 258 Business) and Goldsboro. Added new mileage to US 258, US 117, NC 58, and NC 111. Obviously, I clinched NC 148 - that is until it is extended.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Relief Route That Wasn't: The Never Built I-70 Bypass in the Mid-Mon Valley

In June 1963, a small blurb in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette read that The Westmoreland Engineering Company was awarded a $24,060 bid to study the proposed construction of Interstate 70 in Westmoreland and Washington Counties.  The study was to see what the construction and right-of-way costs "...to modernize the existing highway to Interstate requirements within eight months." (1)  This small, non-attributed, three paragraph article came less than a decade after the completion of a four lane highway that linked the Mid-Mon Valley to the Pennsylvania Turnpike. This would be the start of a 15 year process to upgrade and improve Interstate 70 - a process that ultimately never produced a single foot of new highway.

This is the story, albeit brief, of the I-70 that never came about.

Background:
What is now known as Interstate70 from Washington to New Stanton began as a connecting highway for the region to the Pennsylvania Turnpike.  Known as the "Express Highway", construct…

A look at Pittsburgh's Saw Mill Run Boulevard

Saw Mill Run Boulevard - Pennsylvania State Route 51 - runs through the narrow Saw Mill Run Valley.  It begins at the intersection of Clairton Road and Provost Road at the City of Pittsburgh Line with Brentwood.  It ends at the West End Circle at the entrance to the West End Bridge.  A four lane highway for its the entire length, Saw Mill Run Boulevard consists of interchanges at the South Portal of the Liberty Tubes and with the Parkway West.  It is an expressway from the Parkway to the West End Circle (West End Bypass).  One of the most well known traffic tie-ups in the Pittsburgh area occurs between Maytide Street and PA 88 (Library Road) which is simply known as 'Maytide and 88.'

History:
Saw Mill Run Boulevard was part of the 1928 Allegheny County 'City Beautiful' bond issue.  The bonds resulted in the creation of Saw Mill Run, Ohio River, Allegheny River and Mosside Boulevards. (1)   After the completion of the Liberty Tunnels in 1924, Downtown Pittsburgh was offic…

The Many Failed Plans of Pittsburgh's Wabash Bridge and Tunnel

The December 27, 2004 opening of the Wabash Tunnel ended over 70 years of proposals and speculation for the use of the over 100 year old facility.  The tunnel, which is now a reversible roadway that is an alternative route for rush hour traffic, saw many failed plans during the 20th Century.  These plans included options for mass transit, converted and new bridges for vehicles, and other forms of transportation.

Brief History:
Constructed in 1902-04, the Wabash Bridge and Tunnel was planned and financed by rail mogul, Jay Gould.  Gould began his "Battle of the Wabash" with the established railroads of the city in 1890.  He would finally emerge victorious, but during that struggle, Gould would see many setbacks that would eventually result in the railroad's bankruptcy in 1908.  On October 19, 1903, when the two ends of the bridge were to be joined together over the Monongahela River, the 109' bridge collapsed; killing ten men.  Construction would resume four days later …