Skip to main content

Cross Country Roadtrip - Day 5 Part 2 - Albuquerque to Midland, TX

This post covers the trip from Albuquerque to Midland, Texas via Alamogordo, New Mexico.  White Sands National Monument has already been covered - some of the photos are from the trip to White Sands and the others are obviously after.  :-p

The route: I-40, I-25, US 380, US 54, US 70, White Sands National Monument, US 70, US 82, NM 529, US 62/US 180, US 385, TX 158, TX 191, TX Loop 250, Business I-20.

The entire 79 photo set from the trip is up on flickr.

Over at the aaroads blog, Jake mentioned that New Mexico has begun to use a more classic US shield style on their guide signs.  His examples are on I-40 Eastbound in Santa Rosa.  Well on I-25 South in Bernardo a similar style is for US 60 (Exit 175).  The US 60 shield has a 'US' within the shield above the number.  Unfortunately, I was checking something on my phone when we passed it, and didn't get a picture.

However, in Socorro, there is a guide for Business Loop I-25 and US 60 with an odd font.

IMG_5655

And when did US 60 change to North/South??

IMG_5656

Now US 60 does run North/South through Socorro - but only for a mile or so.

Next up, US 380 east from San Antonio to Carrizozo.  Once the sun angle improved, it was quite an enjoyable - yet isolated - drive.

IMG_5664

IMG_5670

US 70 near Holloman Air Force Base has some nice overhead guides:

IMG_5683

IMG_5684

In Alamogordo, on the old route through town there were still US 82 shields with US 54 and 70.

IMG_5779

Then it was onto US 82 East and the climb into the Sacramento Mountains and Lincoln National Forest.  If you ever want a scenic alternative from I-25 to I-20 and not go through El Paso.  US 82 is the way to go.

Sacramento Mountains

IMG_5792

IMG_5797

There's even a tunnel!

IMG_5799

On the east side of the Sacramento Mountains the views are just as photo worthy.

Otero County View

IMG_5809

The twists and turns of US 82

East of Artesia - You'll find plenty of these:

IMG_5829

And the journey home really began when we passed this sign.

IMG_5840

A few more miles and turns later we pulled into Midland for the night.

One last post left, Day 6 & 7 Midland to North Carolina with an overnight stop in Tuscaloosa.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The story behind the ghost ramps around Pittsburgh International Airport

The roads around Pittsburgh International Airport have a lot of history and intrigue.  The growth of the airport and resulting land acquisitions has changed the routing of many roads in Western Allegheny County.  As the airport grew and traffic around the airport increased, the need for new roads would also change the landscape.  Of course, the fact that this is Pittsburgh means there were also plans for highways that never came to be.  Two of these never built highway plans, the Beaver Valley Expressway (BVE) extension and the full-speed connection to the Southern Expressway at Flaugherty Run Road have traces - specifically ghost ramps - of highways that never came to be.

Beaver Valley Expressway Extension:

For close to three decades this unused piece of roadway along the southern end of Beaver Valley Expressway puzzled Pittsburgh area travelers.  Located near the current-day maintenance hangers for Pittsburgh International Airport, this concrete stub of a highway was supposed to be …

Quemahoning Tunnel

The Quemahoning Tunnel may have never been built by the Pennsylvanina Turnpike Commission, but it still has a history unto itself.  Originally planned to carry rail along the South Penn Railway, the tunnel never would not see any trains until 1909 when a small line named the Pittsburgh, Westmoreland & Somerset began utilizing it.  The use was brief and by the end of 1916 the PW&S was no longer in operation and abandoned the facility.  Twenty-some years later, the newly formed Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission considered using the abandoned tunnel, in fact it was shown on some original plans.  However, the PTC decided against using it, and the tunnel remained empty.

The eastern portal of the Quemahoning Tunnel is easily accessible from the PA Turnpike.  The portal is located at mile 106.3 along the westbound roadway.  The tunnel is one of the many "What Could Have Been's?" of the Pennsylvania Turnpike.  Below, Bill Symons shares photos taken in late Fall of 1986 of …

Roebling Aqueduct

In a quiet and often overlooked corner of Northeastern Pennsylvania, the country's oldest surviving suspension bridge crosses the Delaware River into New York.  The Delaware Aqueduct, designed and built by famed engineer John A. Roebling, has withstood a very colorful history from being an important piece in the region's transportation, to uncertainty during the growth of rail, nearly eight decades of neglect and poor management as a private toll bridge, to finally being restored by the National Park Service and in use as an automobile bridge today.

Construction and Canal Era (1847-1898):
During the 1840's, the Delaware & Hudson Canal was looking at ways to speed up service along its route.  One of the major bottlenecks was where the canal reached the Delaware River.  Since it began operation in 1828, the D&H used a rope ferry to pull traffic along to Canal across the Delaware.  The conflicting traffic of vessels going down the Delaware to Trenton or Philadelphia and…