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14 new miles of Corridor H to open soon

The West Virginia Department of Transportation will be holding a ribbon cutting ceremony on Wednesday to mark the completion of another 14 miles of Corridor H.  Though the ribbon cutting is on Wednesday, a definite date that the new four lane highway will be open to traffic is unknown.

When opened, Corridor H will extended another 14 miles eastward from US 220 in Moorefield to County Route 3 (Knobley Road).  Through traffic will be asked to leave the new highway three and a half miles earlier at an interchange with County Route 5 (Patterson Creek Road).  The remaining three and a half miles to Knobley Road will be open to "Local" traffic only.  Mainline traffic will be able to continue to Knobley Road and beyond in 2013 when an additional 11 miles of Corridor H is expected to open - completing the highway to WV 93 in Bismark.

Details and directions for the ribbon cutting are as follows:


The ceremony has been scheduled for Wednesday, October 27, at 1:30 p.m.  The event staging site will be on the new section of Corridor H in the west bound lane at the Patterson Creek exit.  Traveling west on Corridor H from Moorefield the site is approximately 10 miles from Moorefield.  Traveling from Petersburg to the site, event attendees should take County Route 5 (Patterson Creek Road) and enter the Corridor parking in the east bound lanes. Division of Highways personnel will be on site to direct parking.

Adam Froehlig may be attending the ribbon cutting ceremony if he does, we'll provide a link to his blog entry.

Story Links:
W.Va. to open another section of Corridor H ---Charleston Daily Mail
Governor Announces Completion of Another Section of Corridor H  ---Office of Gov. Joe Manchin

Comments

Jason Ilyes said…
This is great to hear! The ribbon cutting is the same day as mine and Stephs wedding anniversery!

Jason Ilyes
JPI
Lebanon, TN
Home of the Barrel

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