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Interstate 70 overpass in Kammerer, PA hit by 'Hit & Run' overheight tractor trailer - bridge damaged and later demolished

An overheight tractor trailer load, which had special hauling permits, damaged the McIlvanie Road overpass at the Kammerer Exit (Exit 31) on Interstate 70 in Washington County, PA on October 18.  The resulting damage forced PennDot to issue an emergency contract to demolish the nearly 55 year old overpass.

The emergency demolition forced the closure of Interstate 70 in both directions.  (Traffic was detoured along the Exit 31 interchange ramps.)  Interstate 70 was re-opened in both directions by 6 pm this evening.

The driver, Tony Kyle, had a special hauling permit to operate his tractor trailer with the overheight load.  The driver had specific instructions to exit the Interstate at Exit 31 to avoid the 14' 9" bridge.  Mr. Kyle did not exit the highway - and the overheight load struck and damaged the bridge.

Kyle continued on his way after the collision.  Pennsylvania State Law requires that a motorist report significant damage.  Kyle did not, and the incident was treated as a 'hit & run'.

PennDot will replace the bridge.  However, it is not known at this time if the replacement bridge will be closer to modern standards or not.  To meet modern standards, the bridge would need a higher clearance, and additional shoulder and interchange improvements would be needed as well.

Story - Truck damages bridge over I-70; lanes reopened ---Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Comments

If I were PennDOT, I'd send the bill to the trucking company since their driver (or contract driver, perhaps) didn't follow instructions.

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