Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from March, 2011

A Book Recommendation

One of the things I like about this hobby is the selection of books that I can use as references, as a suggestion guide for scenic drives or places to stop by to check out, or even the history behind a road or a bridge. So, it was no surprise to me as I browsed the selection at the soon to be closed Borders Books and Music location in downtown Saratoga Springs, New York, that I would purchase a book about bridge and tunnel crossings over the Hudson River.

The book I purchased that late March evening was entitled Crossing the Hudson, which was written in 2010 by Donald E. Wolf. In Crossing the Hudson, the author explains the accomplishments in engineering, the social history and specific events leading up to the construction and opening of nineteen river crossings between Waterford / Lansingburgh (now part of Troy) and the Holland Tunnel, which connects lower Manhattan with Jersey City. In Wolf's writing, I was treated to a literary work that is chock full of interesting informa…

A stroll along The Mall

A few weeks ago, Maggie and I headed up to Washington, DC for a fun weekend.  We met up with co-blogger Doug Kerr and Adam Froehlig for some sight seeing along The Mall.  This was really both of ours first time to Washington.  I had been there once before on a band trip in the mid-90s, but I didn't really see much, nor did I take any pictures.

For the entire photo set on flickr - head here.

After a quick lunch, we headed down Pennsylvania Avenue towards the Capitol.  One of the most impressive things about the Capitol building is its size.



You really can't appreciate the size and the idea of 'Capitol Hill' until you see it in person.



Another amazingly impressive view is down the Mall towards the Washington Monument.  It is one of many views along The Mall that are awe inspiring, even on a dreary overcast day.



Adam had suggested that we visit the National Botanic Garden which is located right next to the Capitol.  This unplanned stop quickly became a favorite.







From ther…

New Jersey Flickr Update

Just wanted to let anyone who's interested know that I've added scores of New Jersey photos to my Flickr account from a recent trip I made around the Garden State. There's some pictures from the recent Northern New Jersey road meet, a jaunt around South Jersey and more! Abandoned roads, cool old shields, even older bridges and even AAA signage adorn the photo collection.

Check it out at...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dougtone/collections/72157622664080587/

Next on the agenda, some photos from Central New York State, plus wherever the open road takes me this weekend.

A Weekend in Jersey

I decided to attend the 2011 Northern New Jersey (Newark & Suburbs) Road Meet on March 12, 2011, and decided to visit the Garden State for the entire weekend. Besides the road meet, which encompassed two abandoned sections of the Eisenhower Parkway, the abandoned Nikesite Road off of I-78 and the abandoned NJ 58 freeway end in Newark, I also attended a hockey game between the New York Islanders and New Jersey Devils at the Prudential Center in Newark, a short drive around Rutherford, Clifton and Little Falls before the meet, and a nice day trip to Philadelphia and South Jersey the following day with Steve Alpert, the webmaster of Alps' Roads.

Here's some highlights of the weekend's trip...

- Starting off with the road meet, which was attended by 23 people, some of whom came from around the corner, whereas others drove from as far away as Québec and Kentucky. It was also nice to see some new people mixed in with familiar faces.
- The weather, which was nice for the middl…

Henry County (VA) I-73 Alternative Route Environmental Study Complete - with positive reviews

VDOT has completed the Environmental Assessment for the Henry County I-73 Alternative Route.  This route was pushed forward by the Henry County Board of Supervisors in 2007, VDOT released a preliminary impact study of the route in 2009, and the Commonwealth Transportation Board directed VDOT to do an environmental assessment of the alternative routing that December.

Henry County Supervisors had urged the study and possible routing as it ran I-73 closer to Martinsville's eastern edge.  The HCBoS plan would run about two miles longer and appears to cost more.

The alternative routing would utilize five miles of the existing US 58 bypass to the south and east of Martinsville.  That portion of the freeway would need to be upgraded to Interstate standards.  The initial planned alternative ran I-73 further to the east and parallel to US 220 and the southeast corner of the US 58 Bypass.  Both routes would meet north of I-73's junction with VA 87 east of Ridgeway.  The map at right draw…

Remaining stretch of I-485 will feature three unique types of interchanges

The remaining 5.4 miles of I-485 currently under construction in Mecklenburg County will feature three unique interchanges.  All three are in use elsewhere within the country, but would be the first ones built in the Tar Heel State.

At two of the interchanges, the new designs are considered upgrades (in traffic flow and cost savings) versus what had originally been planned.

The interchange design names are Split Diamond, Diverging Diamond, and Turbine.

Heading East from the current terminus at NC 115, the three new interchange designs run as follows:

The Split Diamond interchange will be located at Prosperity Church Road.  This interchange will consist of two access roads and six roundabouts.

The Diverging Diamond Interchange (DDI), first used in Missouri, is starting to catch interest in North Carolina.  The interchange design, actually reverses the lanes of traffic on the surface/cross street.  This will be located at the Mallard Creek Road exit on I-485.

This design replaces a p…

NYC On Foot

It's been awhile since I've been on here-What can I say, I've been a bit busy lately. Most of you may or may not know that I've been routinely going down to New York City to shoot Punk and Hardcore shows-and that's been the largest part of my photographic output over the last couple of years. But, shows don't run 24-7, and I don't sleep the whole time between any given two shows; so that leaves me with time on my hands, and I really don't dig spending that time sitting around looking at TV in the hostel that I usually stay in.
New York City is a fascinating place. I don't mean just the usual touristy stuff either. Every corner you turn, you can find something interesting and unique. It's almost like a state unto itself: particularly as far as the roads are concerned. The signage is much different than the rest of the state, and the iconic double-guyed traffic lights aren't found anywhere else. In fact, new traffic lights follow the same des…

What would be the 'Route 66' of the East?

After Saturday's trip into Southside Virginia - and all of the great pre-Interstate businesses we found, active and abandoned - I started to think about the Old US 66 trip I did last spring.  There are plenty of sites (motor courts, restaurants, neon signs, small towns) and situations (bypassed by the interstate, abandoned businesses, empty two and sometimes four lane roads) similar to that of the revered "Mother Road".

So I have come up with five routes along with reasons for and against being the East Coast version of Route 66.

US 1: The Backbone US Route of the East Coast - Travels through major cities including Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington D.C.  Parallels Interstates 85 and 95 for significant portions of the route.  However, runs as an independent route from Henderson, NC to Jacksonville, FL.

US 301: Bypassed and pretty much ignored by long distanced travelers by Interstate 95 from Richmond/Petersburg, VA to south of Florence, SC.  Roadside…