Skip to main content

Sunday Drive (Down I-93) To I-95

The first (mostly) sunny day in about a week was a good excuse to drive over to Canton to see what progress had been made in the lane adding project and related (and unrelated) sign updating projects along I-93 between Exits 7 and 1. They have largely finished heading southbound between Exits 3 and 1. This is the first photo I could take of the new exit signs for Exits 2 and 1 with an unobstructed view of the new left lane.
I was able to take a closeup shot of the assembly between MA 138 and I-95 that crosses both sides of the highway:
Notice the highway surface which has been roughed up in anticipation of a new (final?) coat of asphalt.

One of the overhead assemblies they have not put up is a 1/2 sign for the MA 138 Exit heading northbound. With the previous one taken down, one has a good view toward I-95 and beyond:
The barriers along the new lane were removed in the past couple weeks, an additional lane will open up on the right for the I-95 Exit. A closer look at the final signs for the I-93 Exit 1, showing progress in putting in the new median barrier in, almost now to the I-95 bridge:
I headed onto I-95 North and then a quick turnaround at the University Ave, Exit 13 interchange. Heading back on I-93 North, this is a view approaching MA 138, showing final landscaping work being performed. A fifth lane will be added here between the on-ramp from I-95 North to MA 138:
 A closer look at the other side of the cross-highway overhead seen in the distance above:
Guess they could think of no other worthy destination to put at the bottom of the MA 138 South sign. 

There were no new signage to take photos of toward the MA 24 exit, so I thought I'd take, possibly for the last time a photo of the current signs:
If you look closely to the right beyond the existing sign support you can see the foundation awaiting the new overhead signs, there is one on the left and also ones for Exit 3 heading south. 

Further on up I-93 there is some evidence as to the future re-signing project getting underway. After most of the current overhead signs you see an orange tag which has the sign contractors name, Liddell Brothers, and a letter/number code. Here's the tag at the MA 28 exit:
If you look closely anyway. The codes have OD then a number. The D referring to they type of signage? Here's another closer shot at a tag by the current 1/2 mile sign for Exit 6, MA 37:
On the Southeast Expressway portion (I-93/US 1/MA 3) there are few of these tags at the overhead sign posts but many others at different places. Some have 'VMS' on the orange tag signs implying a place for a future permanent Variable Message Sign. You can see from this photo heading south at the 'Braintree Split' that the sign replacement project cannot come soon enough, for the one on the right:

I hope to get at least one more trip to the area before I leave for North Carolina in June. Else I'll try to get some photos on my way south.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Abandoned New Stanton Interchange Ramps

For nearly 50 years, the Pennsylvania Turnpike interchange with Interstate 70 and US 119 in New Stanton has been a rather free-flowing double trumpet, grade separated interchange between the two freeways.  But for the first 23 years of the turnpike, this interchange was vastly different.  It was the only non-trumpet interchange within the system (excluding termini points) and featured very tricky and gridlock causing left turns within the interchange.  (See image on right).  With the birth of the Interstate Highway System in the mid-1950s, new freeways were built and in many cases the Turnpike kept the original interchange using local roads to connect to the new freeways.  Interchanges with what would become I-81, I-176, I-80, I-70 in Breezewood, and I-79 were left with the original design.

Meanwhile in the 1950's, the state began building a freeway that ran from New Stanton west towards Washington.  This freeway, signed PA 71, was built to connect those in the industrial Mon Valle…

Quemahoning Tunnel

The Quemahoning Tunnel may have never been built by the Pennsylvanina Turnpike Commission, but it still has a history unto itself.  Originally planned to carry rail along the South Penn Railway, the tunnel never would not see any trains until 1909 when a small line named the Pittsburgh, Westmoreland & Somerset began utilizing it.  The use was brief and by the end of 1916 the PW&S was no longer in operation and abandoned the facility.  Twenty-some years later, the newly formed Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission considered using the abandoned tunnel, in fact it was shown on some original plans.  However, the PTC decided against using it, and the tunnel remained empty.

The eastern portal of the Quemahoning Tunnel is easily accessible from the PA Turnpike.  The portal is located at mile 106.3 along the westbound roadway.  The tunnel is one of the many "What Could Have Been's?" of the Pennsylvania Turnpike.  Below, Bill Symons shares photos taken in late Fall of 1986 of …

Conflict in the Mountains: The Story of Corridor H in West Virginia

Corridor H (US 48) was legislatively created as part of the 1965 Appalachian Regional Development Act.  This route which was designated to run east from Weston via Elkins to Strasburg, Virginia has been West Virginia's most controversial route of the six Appalachian Highway Development System routes that run within the state's borders.  The emotional conflict that has led to numerous legal and political struggles has placed the environment, desire for economic and social progress, and the Eastern West Virginia way of life at odds with each other for nearly four decades.

Early History:
The story of Corridor H begins in the 1930s.  Benton McKay, who orchestrated the creation of the Appalachian Trail, suggested a network of highways and parkways throughout Appalachia. (1)  That proposal would become a key part of the 1965 Appalachian Regional Development Act.  The Act included the creation of the Appalachian Development Highway System (AHDS).  The highway system consisted of "…