Skip to main content

Catching Up: Pittsburgh from Mount Washington (July 2011)

(Editor's Note: While there's some slow time in the few week's before we have a new addition to the family, I'm trying to catch up on blog entries that I wanted to post or started but never completed.  This is another one of those entries.)

Over the 4th of July holiday in 2011, Maggie and I once again headed up to Pittsburgh to visit my family.  Our neighbor's Josh and Shannon were also in the area visiting relatives so we all decided to take in some of the city.  I immediately suggested a trip to Mount Washington, which is one of the most visited neighborhoods in the city.

Pittsburgh Skyline

The reason is quite simple - the impressive views of the city skyline.  There are numerous overlooks along Grandview Avenue each offering a different angle of the magnificent Pittsburgh Skyline.

Of course, the best way to get up to Mount Washington is via the incline.

100_0162

Whether it's the Monongahela (pictured above) or the Duquesne which sits slightly further to the west. I have yet to take a ride on the Duquesne Incline which is something I want and need to do on a future trip home.

The Monongahela Incline has been in continuous operation since 1870 and is the more frequently traveled because of it's proximity to Station Square, downtown via the Smithfield Street Bridge, and the Station Square Light Rail Station.

As I said before, the views of the city are amazing and with all the different overlooks there are so many different angles, perspectives, and viewpoints of the city you can take in.

100_0175

IMG_4832

Gather 'round and take in the view

Grandview Avenue is also know for the various styles of architecture from modern to classic and traditional and everything in between for the homes and apartment buildings.

100_0189

100_0188

But Mount Washington is more than just the great views - it's a vibrant city neighborhood and all it takes is a detour off Grandview Avenue to find out.

100_0182

IMG_4837

IMG_4839

Obviously, if you are visiting Pittsburgh, and have about 30-45 minutes to spare.  Head to Mount Washington - it's worth the view.

100_0190

For the entire set on flickr, head here.

Comments

DJWildBill said…
You wrote an article about Pittsburgh without mentioning The Clarks? That's sacrilege in this part of the country. Anytime I get to Pittsburgh I've made it a point to find out where they are playing.

Popular posts from this blog

The Abandoned New Stanton Interchange Ramps

For nearly 50 years, the Pennsylvania Turnpike interchange with Interstate 70 and US 119 in New Stanton has been a rather free-flowing double trumpet, grade separated interchange between the two freeways.  But for the first 23 years of the turnpike, this interchange was vastly different.  It was the only non-trumpet interchange within the system (excluding termini points) and featured very tricky and gridlock causing left turns within the interchange.  (See image on right).  With the birth of the Interstate Highway System in the mid-1950s, new freeways were built and in many cases the Turnpike kept the original interchange using local roads to connect to the new freeways.  Interchanges with what would become I-81, I-176, I-80, I-70 in Breezewood, and I-79 were left with the original design.

Meanwhile in the 1950's, the state began building a freeway that ran from New Stanton west towards Washington.  This freeway, signed PA 71, was built to connect those in the industrial Mon Valle…

Quemahoning Tunnel

The Quemahoning Tunnel may have never been built by the Pennsylvanina Turnpike Commission, but it still has a history unto itself.  Originally planned to carry rail along the South Penn Railway, the tunnel never would not see any trains until 1909 when a small line named the Pittsburgh, Westmoreland & Somerset began utilizing it.  The use was brief and by the end of 1916 the PW&S was no longer in operation and abandoned the facility.  Twenty-some years later, the newly formed Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission considered using the abandoned tunnel, in fact it was shown on some original plans.  However, the PTC decided against using it, and the tunnel remained empty.

The eastern portal of the Quemahoning Tunnel is easily accessible from the PA Turnpike.  The portal is located at mile 106.3 along the westbound roadway.  The tunnel is one of the many "What Could Have Been's?" of the Pennsylvania Turnpike.  Below, Bill Symons shares photos taken in late Fall of 1986 of …

Icelandic Highways & Byways (Part 2)

Continuing on our series on traveling in Iceland, we'll explore the Golden Circle, which is a popular tourist route in Iceland. The Golden Circle is easily accessible from Reykjavik and includes such must-see places like Thingvellir National Park (spelled as Þingvellir in the Icelandic language), Geysir, which yes, is a geyser, and the Gullfoss waterfall.So yes, the Golden Circle includes a little bit of everything that Iceland has to offer. For those of you playing at home, I drove the
Golden Circle in a clockwise fashion with an impromptu diversion towards the end of my loop, which meant that I missed the hydroponic tomato farm, but I discovered a few other neat things, so it all worked out in the end.

Thingvellir (Þingvellir) is actually situated within the rift valley that separates the Eurasian and North American tectonic plates, as the site where the Alþingi or Althing (in English), which is the Icelandic Parliament met between the years 930 and 1798. So as you can tell, the…