Skip to main content

Catching Up: 2011 Honeymoon Trip - Part 2: St. Augustine, FL


The second city stop during our honeymoon was St. Augustine, Florida.  We stayed at the historic and amazingly impressive Casa Monica Hotel.  The hotel was first opened in 1888, and spent many years vacant and then later as the St. John's County Courthouse until it was renovated and re-opened as a hotel in 1999.

IMG_7559

For the entire set on flickr, head here.

IMG_7507

A view of Flagler College from our hotel balcony.  After checking in, and taking in the views from the balcony, we walked down St. Georges Street on our way to Castillo de San Marcos.  St. Georges Street is the heart of the Old City.  The pedestrian only street is home to numerous shops, restaurants, inns, and it's not limited to St. Georges.  You can find a lot of treasures ducking down an alley or two.

IMG_7513

Just north of St. Georges Street is the Castillo de San Marcos National Monument.  The fort is the oldest masonry fort in the United States as construction began on the structure in 1672.  The fort has also seen service under four different flags and quite a handful of different names as well.

IMG_7517

IMG_7523

Castillo de San Marcos was named a national monument in 1924.  At the time it was called, Fort Marion - in honor of Revolutionary War hero, Francis Marion.  In the 1930s, the WPA created one of there famous screen-print posters promoting tourism to the fort.  You can buy an authentic reproduction of this design today at Ranger Doug Enterprises.  I'll save this for another blog post - but I purchase these great items based on the parks I visit and frame them at our home.

Dinner that night was at the A1A Ale Works, where sitting out on the balcony on a warm blustery evening, we were fortunate to see The Bridge of Lions in action.

IMG_7577

The next morning we took a horse carriage tour of St. Augustine.  Our guide was informative and fun and it was great to see various parts of this historic city at a rather leisurely pace.

Like Flagler College:

IMG_7581

Ancient City Baptist Church:

IMG_7608

Memorial Presbyterian Church:

IMG_7615

which we were fortunate enough to take a look inside of for a brief tour.

IMG_7627

We ended our tour at St. Augustine City Hall - the former Alcazar Hotel.

IMG_7563

At the end of the tour, we checked out of the Casa Monica to head towards Orlando, but we had one more stop.  The St. Augustine Lighthouse.

Soaring to new heights!

Constructed in 1874, the St. Augustine Lighthouse is the second structure that stood here to help navigate the waters around Anastasia Island.  Entrance to the lighthouse is $9.75 per adult and that includes a self guided tour of the lightkeeper's home and the opportunity to climb to the top of the lighthouse.  To view my entire flickr set, head here.

IMG_7643

It can be a dizzying and at the top of the light an extremely narrow climb.  But the views from the top are worth it.

IMG_7652

IMG_7654

St. Augustine is a wonderful city and a great weekend getaway destination.  Though we only spent the better part of one day in the historic city.  It's unique charm and overflowing history is something we won't forget for years to come.



Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Check the box: Interstate 495 to 87 conversion administratively approved

The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials have recently approved North Carolina's application to remove the short-lived Interstate 495 and future I-495 from Raleigh to Rocky Mount.  This administrative move most likely will result in North Carolina signing Interstate 87 and Future I-87 on the entire corridor in the near future.

Approved in 2013, Interstate 495 was first signed in 2014 along US 64 from Interstate 440 in Raleigh to Interstate 540 in Knightdale.  The remaining segment of highway to Rocky Mount was signed as Future Interstate 495.  However, in 2016, North Carolina's congressional legislators were able to get language in the 2015 FAST ACT designating the US 64/US 13/US 17 corridor from Raleigh to Norfolk as an Interstate.  In 2016, the FHWA and AASHTO designated this entire corridor (including the existing Interstate and Future 495) as Interstate 87.  (NCDOT had applied for Interstate 89 along this route.)

It is currently unknown when t…

The story on how the unbuilt US 40 Expressway in Brownsville took 40 years to complete.

For nearly four decades, the four lane US 40 just east of Brownsville came to an abrupt end - shown in the photo above - at Grindstone Road in Redstone Township.   In the late 1960s, what was then the Pennsylvania Division of Highways (PennDOH) extended a new four lane alignment of US 40 eastwards from Broadway Street slightly over one mile to Grindstone Road where an incomplete diamond interchange was built.  Earlier in the decade, PennDOH had built a four lane US 40 in Washington County into Brownsville complete with a new crossing over the Monongahela River known as the Lane Bane Bridge.  This new highway and bridge allowed US 40 to bypass the older Intercounty Bridge and downtown Brownsville. 

After this new highway opened, nothing would happen to it for nearly forty years.  US 40 traffic would use the ramps for this planned diamond interchange and then jog on Grindstone Road briefly before continuing towards Uniontown on the original National Road. 
What is unknown (at least to…

Starrucca Viaduct

Even older than the Tunkhannock Viaduct is the Starrucca Viaduct, built in 1848. Located in the far northeastern Pennsylvania borough of Lanesboro, this impressive bridge carried the New York and Erie Railroad over a valley as well as the Starrucca Creek and is currently the oldest stone arch railroad in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (1). An engineering marvel of its time, and even in today's world, the 1080 foot length, 100 foot height and 25 foot width (2) of the viaduct is simply spectacular. Using local materials such as Pennsylvania bluestone, the Starrucca Viaduct has stood the test of time.With a price estimated at $325,000 in 1848 dollars, the bridge was one of the largest and costliest stone arch railroad bridges built in America at its time (3) . However, the very material that made it expensive to build gave the Starrucca Viaduct much durabilitycompared to other viaducts built in that era.

I've happened to check out the Starrucca Viaduct on a few occasions sin…