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Interstate 495 to be signed in North Carolina sometime soon

NCDOT officially announced today that US 64 between Interstate 440 in Raleigh and Interstate 95 in Rocky Mount has been approved by the FHWA to be signed as Interstate 495.

The section of US 64 between I-440 (Exit 419) and I-540 (Exit 423) will be signed as Interstate 495.  The remainder of US 64 (and US 264 until Zebulon) from Exit 423 to I-95 (Exit 464) will be signed as Future I-495.


No word currently on when either style of the I-495 signs will be posted along US 64.  Nor is there specific plans on when projects to upgrade the US 64 freeway from Rolesville Road (Exit 430) to I-95 will occur.

Improvements to inside and outside shoulders on the route east of Exit 430 along with upgrades to the Nashville bypass will be necessary for the full Interstate designation to be signed along the rest of the route.  NCDOT has unfunded plans to widen the US 64/264 freeway from Rolesville Road to the US 264 East split (Exit 436) to six lanes.  It is possible that the Interstate designation could speed that project up.

I travel the Interstate 495 corridor to work daily - as does co-blogger Brian LeBlanc - so when the route is signed one of us will be sure to post it here.

H/T: Ben Thurkill
I-495 shield courtesy of Shields Up!


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