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Parker's Ferry

The third and final cable river ferry in North Carolina crosses the Meherrin River not that far from the Virginia State Line.  Parker's Ferry is located in Hertford County just north of Winton and east of Murfreesboro.  Similar to both Elwell and Sans Souci, the ferry is a two car cable pulled ferry and takes about five minutes to cross.  Parker's Ferry may be slightly more remote than the other two ferries as it is accessible via a gravel road. The ferry appears to date back to the early 1900s but no exact date is known.

Directions:
  • From Winton: Take US 158 West towards Murfreesboro about one mile west of US 13 turn right onto Parkers Ferry Road. After crossing the ferry - Parkers Ferry Road continues to US 258 in Como, turn right to go towards Virginia or turn left to heads towards Murfreesboro.

  • From Murfreesboro: Head North on US 258 towards Virginia, near Como turn right onto Parkers Ferry Road. After crossing the ferry, follow Parkers Ferry Road to US 158. A right turn returns you to Murfreesboro. Turn left for Winton.

  • From Virginia: Follow US 258 South into North Carolina.  After Como, turn left onto Parkers Ferry Road.  After crossing the ferry, follow Parkers Ferry Road to US 158. A right turn returns you to Murfreesboro. Turn left for Winton.

All photos taken August 30, 2008.

At the south landing of Parker's Ferry.  We'll have to honk our horn to gain the attention of the ferry operator.

The gravel Parkers Ferry Road leads you to and from the ferry.



A view of the Meherrin River.


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