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Philippi Covered Bridge

The Philippi Covered Bridge is one of the most historic bridges in West Virginia.  Built in 1852, it is one of the oldest covered bridges in the state and the country.  The Philippi Covered Bridge is the last remaining covered bridge to serve a US Highway.  Currently, US 250 rides over the dual carriageway.

A straight on view from the Philippi side of the covered bridge that carries US 250
The bridge built by Lemuel Chenoweth has survived the first Civil War land battle, floods, fires, along with structural repairs and widening.  The bridge originally had what amounted to one traffic lane but it was widened in 1934 to accommodate two lanes.  Four years later, the wooden deck was replaced with a concrete floor.   A fire in February 1989 closed the bridge for over two years.  The fire was started as a result of an overflow of gasoline from a nearby station that was ignited by a spark from a passing car's exhaust system.  The bridge would reopen 27 months later in September 1991 with it being designed to match the original construction as closely as possible. (1)

A closer view of the entrance to the bridge as you leave Downtown Philippi.
This photo shows the side of the  yellow poplar and Burr Arch Truss bridge that carries US 250 West
In 2004, a bypass route for US 250 was opened to the South.  The bypass is signed as Truck US 250. Mainline US 250 still routes through town and over the bridge.

A close-up of the complex under workings of the bridg
The stone abutment for the bridge

West Virginia Historical Marker discussing the history of the Bridge.

The City of Philippi uses the bridge as part of the city seal.
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