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Small Towns of Virginia Series - Dillwyn

Downtown Dillwyn, VA along US 15
Dillwyn is a small town located in Central Virginia along the James Madison Highway.  This Buckingham County town of around 450 residents sits just north of the intersection of Virginia Route 20 and US 15.  Dillwyn is not far from the physical geographic center of Virginia which is about eight miles west of town in Mount Rush.

The former Buckingham Farm Supply store.

Dillwyn is home to the Buckingham Branch Railroad.  The rail is Virginia's largest short-line railway company operating nearly 275 miles within the Commonwealth.  The rail line began in 1989 when the Bryant family purchased 17 miles of a branch line from Dillwyn north to Bremo Bluff from CSX.  The company grew in 2004 and 2009 when it entered leasing agreements with CSX and Norfolk Southern respectively.

The Buckingham Branch does offer seasonal excursion trains out of Dillwyn in the Spring and Fall.  In addition, during December they offer a train ride with Santa Claus.  The railroad partners with the Old Dominion Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society for these excursions.


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