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Small Towns of Virginia Series - Hanover

 The Historic Hanover Courthouse Building built in 1735.
The small village of Hanover sits as the County Seat of growing Hanover County.  Surrounded by centuries of history, this town of nearly 500 people along US Route 301 has lodged many famous dignitaries at an over two centuries old tavern and has been the birthplace of many notable names in American History.  The historic courthouse that sits off of the main highway was built in 1735.  Patrick Henry would make a name for himself here when he argued the Parson's Case in 1763.

The well-known Hanover Tavern
Directly across from the historic Courthouse building stands an equally historic location, Hanover Tavern.  Since 1733, a tavern has located its site.  The oldest part of the current building dates to 1791.  Many well-known names in early American history stayed at the Hanover Tavern site.  George Washington, Marquis de LaFayette, and Lord Cornwallis spent time here.  As did Patrick Henry when he argued the 1763 Parson's case.  The tavern would see years of use diminish as the automobile era lessened the need for overnight stays.  The tavern would remain active through World War II, but by the 1950s, it would sit almost empty.  In 1953, a group of New York actors would buy the tavern, restore it, and start the Barkdale Theatre.  It was a very popular Richmond destination into the 1980s.  In 1990, the Hanover Tavern Foundation was formed, and they purchased the building and the surrounding land.  The group began a restoration in the mid-90s and in 2004-05 began another restoration.  Today, the Hanover Tavern hosts dinners and banquets, art showings, historical reenactments, and other civic events.
 
The Hanover Cafe adds to the charm of modern day Hanover.
Today, Hanover is a small village that sits on US 301.  It is full of history and is worth taking 30 minutes out of your travels to walk around and experience.

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