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Small Towns of Virginia Series - Pound

Downtown Pound, Virginia
Just south of the Kentucky State Line along US 23 is the Town of Pound.  This Mountain Empire town of nearly 1,000 is a sample of many of the small towns in this region - tucked away within the folds of the numerous hills and mountains of the area and not a straight road to be found.

The Pound Hardware & Furniture Company building is now home to a hodgepodge of different shops.
Pound sits along Virginia's Crooked Road - a meandering journey through Southwest Virginia highlighting and celebrating the regions connection to Americana and Bluegrass Music.  Pound celebrates its piece of Bluegrass Heritage 7:00 pm every Thursday night at the Pound Town Hall Building.  "Pickin' in the Pound" features local bluegrass musicians and southwest Virginia hospitality.

Until 2011, Pound was home to the Pound High School Wildcats.  That year, Wise County consolidated Pound HS with Wise's J.J. Kelly High School to form Central High School in Norton.  The new Central High School would open in 2013.  From my visit there in 2008, Pound was very proud of their high school.

This local store displays Pound High School Wildcat Pride

Pound sits along the Pound River and is served by US 23 and Virginia Route 83.  The planned Coalfields Expressway - which will run from Beckley, WV southwest to Pound - will have its southern terminus here.  There is no timetable for completion for this road.

The Pixie Drive-In was for sale by owner in 2008; however, it is still there and under new ownership.
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