Skip to main content

West Dummerston Covered Bridge

Most covered bridges in Vermont or anywhere else in the United States aren't terribly long. Most are under 120 feet.  The West Dummerston Covered Bridge is depending on the source anywhere from 267, 271 or 280 feet in length.  It is a two span covered bridge that crosses the West River in the Town of Dummerston.

The bridge is the longest covered bridge that is entirely within the state of Vermont.  The Cornish-Windsor bridge is longer at 449 feet but is shared by both Vermont and the State of New Hampshire.   The West Dummerston Bridge was built in 1872 and is of the town lattice truss design.  The bridge is actually the fourth crossing of the West River at or near this site.  Three prior bridges were built prior to the the 1872 bridge and all were washed away by floods.  (1)  The bridge was built by Celeb B. Lamson and is the only surviving bridge that he had built. (2)  The bridge was closed to vehicular traffic in 1993 and only reopened after an extensive rehabilitation was completed in 1998. (1)  The bridge was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

The West Dummerston is easily accessible and often photographed.  There are a handful of spots along Vermont 30 to take photos of this bridge.  The bridge is also a popular spot for fishing or swimming in the West River.  Additionally, the bridge seems to be an inspiration point for many artists as painters or even musicians find the tranquility of this location great to practice or even perform their talents.

Bridge Specs:
  • Number: 45-13-02
  • Design: Town Lattice
  • Length: 280 feet
  • Built: 1872
  • Crosses: West River
Sources & Links:

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The story on how the unbuilt US 40 Expressway in Brownsville took 40 years to complete.

For nearly four decades, the four lane US 40 just east of Brownsville came to an abrupt end - shown in the photo above - at Grindstone Road in Redstone Township.   In the late 1960s, what was then the Pennsylvania Division of Highways (PennDOH) extended a new four lane alignment of US 40 eastwards from Broadway Street slightly over one mile to Grindstone Road where an incomplete diamond interchange was built.  Earlier in the decade, PennDOH had built a four lane US 40 in Washington County into Brownsville complete with a new crossing over the Monongahela River known as the Lane Bane Bridge.  This new highway and bridge allowed US 40 to bypass the older Intercounty Bridge and downtown Brownsville. 

After this new highway opened, nothing would happen to it for nearly forty years.  US 40 traffic would use the ramps for this planned diamond interchange and then jog on Grindstone Road briefly before continuing towards Uniontown on the original National Road. 
What is unknown (at least to…

The story of the Boy Scout Ramps on Interstate 79 North in NW Pennsylvania

If you are traveling on Interstate 79 North of Pittsburgh, you may notice the remnants of a set of off and on ramps at mile 100 just north of Exit 99 (US 422).  There's a story behind these ramps.  Forty years ago, these ramps were built specifically for two Boy Scout Jamboree's that were held at Moraine State Park - 1973 and 1977.  The ramps purpose were to provide access to the north shore of Lake Arthur where the bulk of the festivities and campsite for the Jamboree were located.  (Lawrence County Memories has a great write up and map of the festivities on its site.)

Not long after the Jamboree ended the ramps were abandoned.  There are still remnants of the Boy Scout Ramps today.



Above: Sattelite view of the Boy Scout Jamboree Ramps. 
Below: A view of the ramps from I-79 South.



The google street view image above gives a view along West Park Road of where the set of ramps intersected the highway.  The ramps provided direct access to North Shore Drive (which is the right tur…

The few clues of the Northern Durham Parkway

Sometimes when you look through a box of maps for the first time in five years, you come across something you may have easily over looked.  Such was the case when I found a 2004 (so rather recent) map of Raleigh.  This map was made by the Dolph Map Company for WakeMed.  In the Northwestern corner of Wake County, there were two items to the map showing roads that are still not in existence 13 years later.

The road is the Northern Durham Parkway - this is a proposed 19 mile highway from US 501 north of Durham to the Raleigh-Durham International Airport.  The first proposals for this highway date back to 1967 when Eno Drive-Gorman Road was listed on the Durham Area Thoroughfare Plan. (1)  Other proposals called the highway the Northwest and Northeast Durham Loop. (2)  The route would serve as a northern and eastern bypass of Durham almost serving as a near loop.  The route was fought vigorously for three decades by the Eno River Association citing concerns for the the Eno River, nearby n…