Skip to main content

California State Route 63

Today's featured California highway is one with a really strange and elusive history; California State Route 63.  CA 63 is a north/south route running from CA 137 in Tulare in Tulare County to CA 180 in Fresno County.  CA 63 is a good mix of urban highway and rural country roads in the Sierra Nevada Foot Hills.

 
The history of CA 63 is somewhat vague, much of the discussion about it on AAroads doesn't offer a fully clear history:

AAroads discussion on CA 63, LRN 130, CA 201, and CR J21

I started my journey on CA 63 out from the southern terminus in Tulare.  Originally CA 63 reached US 99 in Tulare along Tulare Avenue which is now CA 137.  According CAhighways.org CA 63 was cut back to the current terminus at CA 137 back in 1965.  It would seem that CA 63 multiplexed CA 137 to US 99 when it was renumbered from unsigned Legislative Route Number 134 in 1964:

CAhighways.org on CA 63

A quick view east on Tulare Avenue/CA 137 east to the southern terminus of CA 63 at Mooney Boulevard.







Mooney Boulevard runs north five miles to the city limit of Visalia as an expressway with an odd speed limit of 60 MPH.





CA 63 north follows Mooney Boulevard north another four miles to Noble Avenue where it multiplexes onto the CA 198 freeway for about half a mile.  CA 63 exits immediately back onto Noble Avenue and turns north into downtown Visalia as a one-way highway on Court Street.










CA 63 north follows Court Street to Oval Park where it uses a large roundabout to exit onto Northwest 3rd Avenue.  CA 63 north meets CA 63 south at Dinuba Boulevard which it uses to exit the northern city limits of Visalia near the St. John's River.  For reference CA 63 south uses West Street, Northwest 2nd Avenue, Locust Street, and Mineral King Avenue to reach the CA 63 freeway.










At Avenue 328 CA 63 meets the unsigned County Route J34.

 
Tulare County is infamously bad at signing designated County Routes, in fact the only one I ever found that was signed in the field was J37:

Yokohl Valley Drive/Mountain Route 296 and CR J37 on AAroads

Between Visalia and Cutler CA 63 is a two-lane road which briefly multiplexes CA 201.  CA 201 splits west towards Kingsburg just south of the Cutler CDP line.










CA 63 becomes a four-lane road in Cutler which continues north to Orosi.






At the intersection of Avenue 416/El Monte Way is the junction with unsigned County Route J40 on the left westbound.  Eastbound on El Monte Way was once LRN 130 and likely once CA 63 into the Sierras to a terminus at CA 65.  The road north was once an extension of LRN 132 to Orange Cove.





The junction above is where the history of CA 63 gets murky.  From my own map research CA 63 first appears over what was LRN 132 from US 99 north to Orosi in 1950:

1950 State Highway Map

The 1950 State Highway Map doesn't show a signed state highway on LRN 130.  However, NE2 from AAroads provided a Topographical map from 1950 showing CA 63 running east of Orosi to CA 65.

1950 Orosi Topographical

In my own research I located a 1956 State Highway Map showing CA 63 running east of Orosi to CA 65.

1956 State Highway Map

In 1964 during the California Highway Renumbering LRN 132 north of Orosi was reassigned as LRN 226 but was never apparently signed in the field.  Interestingly the same map shows LRN 130 east of Orosi renumbered to LRN 63 which seems to imply it wasn't signed at the time.  As stated in the AAroads discussion there is debate whether CA 63 was ever actually signed east of Orosi at any point, without photographic evidence the true answer remains elusive.

1964 State Highway Map

The 1966 State Highway Map shows LRN 226 renumbered as LRN 63 which an implied extension to CA 180.  LRN 63 is also still shown running east out of Orosi to what was once CA 65 renumbered to CA 69.

1966 State Highway Map

By 1967 the State Highway Map shows what was LRN 130/LRN 63 east of Orosi removed as a state highway.  The road north to Orange Cove with the implied extension of CA 63 to CA 180 is still not complete.

1967 State Highway Map

By the 1969 State Highway Map shows CA 63 running north from Orosi to CA 180 in the Sierra Foothills.

1969 State Highway Map

So, with all that in mind the road north of Orosi is rural and quickly drops to two-lanes.  CA 63 runs north on Road 128 before taking a western turn on Avenue 460.  At Park Boulevard CA 63 meets the limits of Orange Cove, the Fresno County Line, and County Route J19.  J19 runs south from Orange Cove on Hill Valley Road and is signed given it is in Fresno County.  Odd to think that this small section of road was once the full extend of LRN 226.















North of Orange Cover CA 63 runs on Hills Valley Road which quickly approaches the Sierra Foothills.






The grade uphill in the last two/three miles of CA 63 is deceptively huge and gains about 1,000 feet in elevation before meeting CA 180.  Last year I warped my left front brake rotor descending to San Joaquin Valley on this grade given that I hit my brakes so hard to slow down after being caught off guard by the grade.  I would speculate this section of CA 63 is a 10% grade in places but I could be wrong.  Caltrans is horrible at publishing information on grade percentages, I often use cycling websites for grade information in California.  CA 63 ends without and "end" placard but has a decent overlook down into San Joaquin Valley.










I guess in conclusion is ask for an open call on any historical information regarding early CA 63.  Specifically I would really like to find out for sure if CA 63 was truly signed east of Orosi as there is substantial evidence suggesting it was at one point.  Please feel free to leave a comment if you have any additional information regarding the road east of Orosi this or anything regarding CA 63.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Legend of the Ridge Route; a history of crossing the mountains between the Los Angeles Basin and San Joaquin Valley from wagon trails to Interstates

Over the past two decades I've crossed the Interstate 5 corridor from Los Angeles north over the Sierra Pelona Mountains and Tehachapi Range to San Joaquin Valley what seems to be an immeasurable number of times.  While Interstate 5 from Castaic Junction to Grapevine via Tejon Pass today is known to most as "The Grapevine" it occupies a corridor which has been traversed by numerous historic highways.  The most notable of these highways is known as the "Ridge Route."  This article is dedicated to the Ridge Route and the various highways that preceded it. 


The Ridge Route is a 44 mile section of highway which was completed in 1915.  The Ridge Route originally stretched from Castaic Junction north over Liebre Summit and Tejon Pass to the tiny community of Grapevine.  In spite of a roadway that once utilized nearly 700 curves the Ridge Route is generally considered far ahead of it's time and one of the first modern highways constructed for automotive use.  The…

California Ferry Routes; CA 84 over the Real McCoy II Ferry and CA 220 over the J-Mack Ferry

This past weekend I had was up in the Sacramento River Delta and drove both State Highway Ferry Routes; California State Route 84 via the Real McCoy Ferry and CA 220 via the J-Mack Ferry.


Both State Highway Ferry routes crosses the waters of the Sacramento River Delta to Ryer Island.  My approach to Ryer Island began in Solano County on CA 12 heading westbound over the Rio Vista Bridge.  As traffic is approaching the western flank of the Rio Vista Bridge there is an exit for the north segment of CA 84.  Said CA 84 exit directs traffic to downtown Rio Vista and Ryer Island.  Oddly CA 84 isn't signed on westbound CA 12 but is on eastbound CA 12.



CA 84 is actually signed north of Rio Vista just not very well.  I only encountered two reassurance shields; the first being below the Rio Vista Bridge.  Traffic on CA 84 is advised that Ryer Island is only two miles to the north.





Most of the signage on CA 84 is old and still has button-copy.  Sacramento is signed as 36 miles northward from…

Ghost Town Tuesday; Vineland, Florida; the town killed by Disney

Vineland is a small ghost town located in southwest Orange County, Florida near the junction of Florida State Road 535 and Interstate 4.  Vineland is somewhat unique due to it largely being squeezed out of existence by Lake Buena Vista which is the company town where Disney World is located.


Vineland was founded in the late 1800s as Englewood.  The town name of Englewood changed to Orange Center in 1911 before finally assuming the name Vineland in 1924.  Much like the rest of Orange County the community of Vineland was centered around Citrus Grove.  In the case of Vineland said orange groves were centered around Ruby Lake.

The end of Vineland came as the Disney Corporation began purchasing parcels of citrus grove land to build Lake Buena Vista.  Vineland fell into a sharp decline in the 1960s but the community managed to continue to exist to modern times.  Much of the street grid of Vineland still exists east of FL 535 but most of the original structures are either gone or fallen into…