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Throwback Thursday; California State Route 75

I figured that I would throw my hat in for some Throwback Thursdays myself given that I have a ton of older road albums that I've been looking at updating.  Today's throw back goes back to February 5th 2010 along California State Route 75 in Coronado.






CA 75 wasn't one of the original Signed State Highways from 1934 but rather was unsigned Legislative Route 199.  LRN 199 became CA 75 at least by 1938 as it appears on state highway maps.

1938 California State Highway Map

Prior to 1969 CA 75 ended in Coronado.  The 1935 California Divisions of Highways Map indicates the route of LRN 199/CA 75 essentially is the same as it is today but had the route ending at Orange Avenue and 4th Street.

1935 California Divisions of Highways San Diego County Map

By 1969 CA 75 had been extended to I-5 in San Diego via the San Diego-Coronado Bridge was completed.  The change can be seen on the 1969 and 1970 State Highway Maps.

1969 State Highway Map

1970 State Highway Map

At the time I wasn't so great at taking road photos but I thought that I got a couple decent ones of the San Diego-Coronado Bridge.  I actually did a run along the bay down to the Hotel Del Coronado.









The reason I ran down to the Hotel Del Coronado was due to the parking being something absurd like $15 dollars an hour even back in 2010.  There wasn't a fee to walk into the Hotel or use the beach grounds along the Silver Strand.  The Hotel Del Coronado was completed back in 1888 and if memory serves correct it has something in the neighborhood of 700 rooms.  There were some decent view to be had looking northeast towards Point Loma to boot.



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