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California State Route 165

The final route clinch of Saturday was California State Route 165.






CA 165 is a 38 mile north/south state highway traveling from CA 99 in Turlock to I-5 south of Los Banos.  I started CA 165 from CA 99 in Turlock and headed southbound towards I-5.






South of Turlock CA 165 runs on Lander Avenue.  All of CA 165 is designated as a Safety Corridor and has heavy truck traffic between CA 99 in Turlock south to CA 152/33 in Los Banos.







Just north of Hilmar CA 165 exits Stanislaus County and enters Merced county.


Hilmar is 4 miles south of Turlock on CA 165.  Hilmar dates back to the late 1910s and once the southern terminus of the now defunct Tidewater Southern Railway.   The community is mostly known today as the location of the Hilmar Cheese Company which just so happens to be located on CA 165.






South of Hilmar CA 165 twists around farm parcels on an approach to a bridge over the Merced River.





South of the Merced River CA 165 briefly multiplexes the east/west County Route J18 from River Road to Westside Boulevard.






CA 165 south next enters Stevinson which apparently dates back to the 1900s.





CA 165 junctions CA 140 in Stevinson.





South of CA 140 the routing of CA 165 crosses the San Joaquin River and enters Great Grass Lands State Park and San Luis National Wildlife Refuge.  Both parks are undeveloped marsh land along the San Joaquin River and a fairly decent analog as to how wet San Joaquin Valley used to be.  Despite the low rain levels this winter there was still plenty of water pouring into the surrounding landscape from the San Joaquin River.







CA 165 enters Los Banos and junctions CA 152/33 at Pacheco Boulevard.  CA 165 south of CA 152/33 is signed as "To I-5."






CA 165 south of Los Banos is signed on Mercey Springs Road which I find to be odd since there doesn't appear to be a through route connecting to the actual springs.  I did find this nice little wood/concrete bridge south of Los Banos on CA 165 on the Main Canal.  The bridge date is listed as being completed in 1949 which was well before the state was involved in maintenance.








Approaching the Diablo Range CA 165 crosses the California Aqueduct San Luis Canal.





CA 165 ends at I-5 and has a proper shield/end placard combination.






The current CA 165 is the second highway to be numbered as such.  The current CA 165 was signed into legislation in 1970 according to CAhighways.

CAhighways on CA 165

By 1975 CA 165 is shown complete from CA 140 south to I-5 on the state highway map.

1975 State Highway Map

CA 165 appears to have been completed from CA 99 south to CA 140 sometime between 1977 and 1979.  The change in the route completion can be seen by comparing the state highway maps from the two respective years.

1977 State Highway Map

1979 State Highway Map

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