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Happy 100th Birthday, Finland!

On December 6, 1917, the nation of Finland had declared its independence from Russia. Today, on the 100th anniversary of Finland's Declaration of Independence from having been ruled by Russia, and before then, Sweden, I would like to share some road photos I took on a rainy day in August 2015 when I visited the Finnish national capital city of Helsinki. Enjoy!

A couple of pedestrian and bicycle signs.

A couple of bridges as seen from the cruise ship landing in Helsinki's harbor area.

Helsinki has a tram that also serves as a pub. It's known as the Spårakoff Pub Tram. Unfortunately, I did not have the time to take the Pub Tram as I was visiting Helsinki for just a part of the day, since I had a short cruise port visit.

Signs for Turku and Hanko (in Finnish), or Åbo and Hangö (in Swedish). Finnish highway signs may be posted in both the Finnish and Swedish languages as there is a large Swedish speaking population in Finland.

Signs for Turku and Tampere. You can find out more about Finnish road signs by visiting the website of the Finnish Transport Agency.

As far as I can tell, Katajanokka and Etelästama are neighborhoods within Helsinki.

Finland takes part in the European road network, as E75 is one of the E-Roads that criss-cross Europe. Finland also has their own network of roads within the country, of course.

A sign for Turku, Hanko and Tampere.

Also, if you want to see a little more of Helsinki than just the roads, feel free to check out my Flickr collection of Finland.

Sources and Links:
"History of Finland" --- Mother Earth Travel
"Destination Helsinki" --- VisitFinland.com
"Spårakoff - Pub Tram" --- VisitHelsinki.fi
"Traffic Signs" --- Finnish Transport Agency
"Trans-European Transport Network" --- European Commission Mobility and Transport
"Introduction to Roads in Finland" --- Roads in Finland (Matti Grönroos)
"Finland" --- Doug Kerr/Flickr

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