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Showing posts from February, 2017

A visit to the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike - October 2004

In October 2004, Pennsylvania Highways webmaster and friend of the blog, Jeff Kitsko, hosted a road meet centered on the abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike in Breezewood.  I was fortunate to attend.  What is unique about this trip to the abandoned highway is that we actually were able to drive on the old turnpike 36 years after it was bypassed.  We also were able to walk into the offices and ventilation areas of the tunnels for a unique perspective of the old highway.  Co-blogger Doug Kerr also was at the meet and some of his photos are included below.


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After 16 years, here's why the Pike 2 Bike Trail has never gotten off the ground

Since posting about the Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike, I started to do some digging on why there has been little to no progress on converting the highway into a multi-use trail.  Basically, it would be similar to the popular rail trails and greenways throughout the country.  We'll begin some background on when the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission sold 8.5 miles of what was once the Pennsylvania Turnpike to the Southern Alleghenies Conservancy (SAC) for one dollar.  The SAC's intentions were to convert the turnpike to a multi-use trail by preserving and adding lighting through the two tunnels (Rays and Sideling Hill), repaving at least 10' of the highway, creating trailheads, and more.

Sadly, in the sixteen years that have since passed, not much if anything has been done to either preserve the abandoned roadway or convert it to a multi-use trail.  Yet during this same time, numerous newspaper articles and features, websites, and blog entries about the abandoned turnpike h…

Icelandic Highways & Byways (Part 1)

From time to time, I do have the opportunity to travel internationally. Our world has so much to offer both domestically and abroad that I like to take any chance I can get to see different places. So when the opportunity arose to travel to Iceland with some friends in September and October 2016, I jumped for the chance to go. I got to see geysers, volcanoes, waterfalls, black sand beaches, the geothermal pools that Iceland is famous for, plus I spent a week using Iceland's capital city of Reykjavik as a home base. I also got to take plenty of road photos during my travels as well. This series will focus more on the road aspect of Iceland, but I will be including some photos of the places I saw along the way as well.

This first part of this Icelandic Highways and Byways series will focus on the roads around Reykjavik, with the first set of photos being from Sæbraut, which is part of Iceland Route 41 that eventually makes its way down to the Keflavik International Airport. Keflavik

Meadville's PennDOT Road Sign Scultpture Garden

The PennDOT Road Sign Scultpture Garden in Meadville, Pennsylvania is a joint public art project between PennDOT and Allegheny College that began in 2002 to give a distinct look to Meadville's gateway from the west. Using recycled signs and tires, it is truly one of a kind. The sign garden is located at a Meadville PennDOT residency at US 6, US 19 and US 322's junction with PA 102, east of Interstate 79 and west of downtown Meadville. I've had a few occasions to check out the sign sculpture garden myself and I fully endorse recycling signs in this manner. It's a nice little stop to stretch your legs. I took the following pictures in September 2007.

One of the first parts of the project, and what you'll notice first if you are coming from the west, is the Signs and Flowers part of the art exhibit. This is also next to where you would likely park your car if you wanted to stop and take a look around.





There's also a wall of signs called the Read Between the S…

Breezewood in the Fall....The Abandoned PA Turnpike

Editor's Note: Bernie Newman's Breezewood in the Fall was the first real feature that I had on my fledgling website in late 1999.  It was also one of the first online features about the abandoned turnpike and its tunnels.  From November 1999 to about 2003-04, I would receive numerous e-mails about the tunnels and accessing the old roadway as a result of Mr. Newman's work.  Today, there are numerouswebpages and social media groups devoted to this abandoned stretch of highway.  

In 1968, The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission successfully completed a bypass of two tunnels - Sideling and Ray's Hill - one service plaza - Cove Valley - and nearly 13 miles of roadway.  Since then this forgotten section of road has been a destination point for turnpike enthusiasts, hikers and bicyclists, curiosity seekers, and the Turnpike Commission itself.  The abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike serves as a living history of the nearly 80 year old highway.  

The Breezewood Interchange incorporates…