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A Scenic Drive along GA 246

Georgia Highway 246 begins its climb into the Blue Ridge Mountains. (John Krakoff)
For as brief a route that Georgia Highway 246 is, and for as remote an area of the state it is located in, Highway 246 is one of the state's most unique.  What makes this route, located in the rugged mountains of Rabun County, different is that it crosses into North Carolina, returns back to Georgia, before entering North Carolina again and becoming NC Highway 106.  (See map at right.)  


GA 246 starts at US 23/441 just north of Dillard.  It is THE access road to Sky Valley and the Sky Valley Resort.  However, the best access to the resort is after the highway enters North Carolina.  Impressively scenic year round, the GA 246/NC 106 drive is considered a top route by motorcycle touring groups.  One of the biggest attractions to the route is Estatoah Falls.   Although the falls are located on private property, there are numerous vantage points of the falls all along GA 246.

Eastbound Photos:

GA 246 begins to get curvy not long into its routing. (John Krakoff)
The first time GA 246 enters NC, it is only marked by a small 'NC' blade.  It's only at the final entry into the Tar Heel State - and changeover into NC 106 - that the standard 'WELCOME TO NORTH CAROLINA' guide sign sits. (John Krakoff)

Even within North Carolina, GA 246 maintains its great autumn scenery. (John Krakoff)
We're back in Georgia and now within the city limits of Sky Valley. (John Krakoff)
The amount of sweeping switchbacks along GA 246 is one of the main reasons it is a favorite among motorcyclists  (John Krakoff).

From a scenic overlook on the Georgia side, a great view of the valley below. (John Krakoff)
Scenic overlooks along GA 246 allow for great views like these. (John Krakoff)
(John Krakoff)
Westbound Photos:

One of the numerous switchback curves on GA 246. (John Krakoff)

The descent down the Blue Ridge on GA 246 is just as scenic as climbing the mountain. (John Krakoff)

(John Krakoff)

(John Krakoff)

GA 246 re-enters North Carolina for one last time on this hairpin turn. (John Krakoff)

The last photo of this set as GA 246 heads back towards Dillard. (John Krakoff)
Sources & Links:
  • John Krakoff - Photos Taken October 30, 2006.

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