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A trip to Pennsylvania...featuring ARC Highway Corridor L

Kristy and I headed up to Pennsylvania this weekend, and this time we did stop and take photos.

The trip up was the usual. I-40, US 52, I-77, US 19, I-79 bit the only difference was I took I-79 to I-70 in Washington and over vs. I-68 and PA 43. The reason, it was 10 pm and I didn't want to be traveling two lane WV/PA 857 and parts of PA 51 at night.

For the photo set (including the trip home), here's the flickr link:

On the way, we did a few stops in West Virginia. The first stop was at the WV Vietnam Veterans Memorial off of I-77 Exit 9 on US 460.

The memorial is well stated with a fountain, benches, and the list of those that died from the area enclosed in a circular wall.


Most of the photos from the trip up were along US 19 and specifically ARC Corridor L. The hope is to incorporate the photos into a history page on the highway.

From the South, Corridor L begins at the West Virginia Turnpike at Exit 48. The guide signs read 'TO' US 19 as US 19 actually joins/leaves Corridor L about 3/4 of a mile to the north. Oddly, official WV state maps note the small segment of Corridor L between US 19 and the WV Turnpike as 'Alternate' US 19. (I am not sure if this designation is officially recognized.)


Below is the diamond interchange where US 19 joins Corridor L.

Corridor L is considered an Expressway or greater for its entire 69 mile length. The only true segment that is considered a freeway controlled access is the Oak Hill Bypass. Ironically, the Oak Hill Bypass was originally built for US 21 and prior to the establishment of Corridor L. In fact, a few of the county secondary roads are based off numbering from US 21 (See third photo).



The next town that US 19/Corridor L meets is Fayetteville. Fayetteville sits north of Oak Hill and south of the New River Gorge Bridge. Fayetteville has a 50 mph speed limit, and although it is not as notorious as Summersville to the north, the town does set speed traps. And on this day, we saw two Fayetteville police cars running speed traps - one northbound; the other southbound.

Here's Corridor L approaching Fayetteville.

Of course, just beyond Fayetteville is the famous New River Gorge Bridge. These photos were taken in July of 2007.


From there Corridor L takes a leisurely and enjoyable ride to Summersville, where you are greeted by this sign.

Yes, and because of that strict enforcement, an enjoyable and fast moving ride becomes slow (especially when going into or out of the ravine to the south of town), full of traffic lights, and always most amusing the restart of 65 mph and higher traffic once exiting the commercial strip of town.

For those of you that haven't been on US 19 through Summersville, here's what it looks like.

Once out of Summersville, US 19 continues as an enjoyable drive for nearly 30 miles before ending at Interstate 79. There are a few more mountainous hill climbs, but overall it is very relaxing.

At mile marker 55.5 (more on that in a moment), there is a Scenic View on the Northbound lanes that is worth stopping at.


Finally, along all ARC Corridors in West Virginia, the DOH has installed special milemarkers that look like this:
That concludes the trip up. My next post takes a look at the Sideling Hill Cut on I-68 in Maryland

Comments

Nice photos, Adam.

Thanks for sharing.

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