Skip to main content

A trip to Pennsylvania...featuring ARC Highway Corridor L

Kristy and I headed up to Pennsylvania this weekend, and this time we did stop and take photos.

The trip up was the usual. I-40, US 52, I-77, US 19, I-79 bit the only difference was I took I-79 to I-70 in Washington and over vs. I-68 and PA 43. The reason, it was 10 pm and I didn't want to be traveling two lane WV/PA 857 and parts of PA 51 at night.

For the photo set (including the trip home), here's the flickr link:

On the way, we did a few stops in West Virginia. The first stop was at the WV Vietnam Veterans Memorial off of I-77 Exit 9 on US 460.

The memorial is well stated with a fountain, benches, and the list of those that died from the area enclosed in a circular wall.

Most of the photos from the trip up were along US 19 and specifically ARC Corridor L. The hope is to incorporate the photos into a history page on the highway.

From the South, Corridor L begins at the West Virginia Turnpike at Exit 48. The guide signs read 'TO' US 19 as US 19 actually joins/leaves Corridor L about 3/4 of a mile to the north. Oddly, official WV state maps note the small segment of Corridor L between US 19 and the WV Turnpike as 'Alternate' US 19. (I am not sure if this designation is officially recognized.)

Below is the diamond interchange where US 19 joins Corridor L.

Corridor L is considered an Expressway or greater for its entire 69 mile length. The only true segment that is considered a freeway controlled access is the Oak Hill Bypass. Ironically, the Oak Hill Bypass was originally built for US 21 and prior to the establishment of Corridor L. In fact, a few of the county secondary roads are based off numbering from US 21 (See third photo).

The next town that US 19/Corridor L meets is Fayetteville. Fayetteville sits north of Oak Hill and south of the New River Gorge Bridge. Fayetteville has a 50 mph speed limit, and although it is not as notorious as Summersville to the north, the town does set speed traps. And on this day, we saw two Fayetteville police cars running speed traps - one northbound; the other southbound.

Here's Corridor L approaching Fayetteville.

Of course, just beyond Fayetteville is the famous New River Gorge Bridge. These photos were taken in July of 2007.

From there Corridor L takes a leisurely and enjoyable ride to Summersville, where you are greeted by this sign.

Yes, and because of that strict enforcement, an enjoyable and fast moving ride becomes slow (especially when going into or out of the ravine to the south of town), full of traffic lights, and always most amusing the restart of 65 mph and higher traffic once exiting the commercial strip of town.

For those of you that haven't been on US 19 through Summersville, here's what it looks like.

Once out of Summersville, US 19 continues as an enjoyable drive for nearly 30 miles before ending at Interstate 79. There are a few more mountainous hill climbs, but overall it is very relaxing.

At mile marker 55.5 (more on that in a moment), there is a Scenic View on the Northbound lanes that is worth stopping at.

Finally, along all ARC Corridors in West Virginia, the DOH has installed special milemarkers that look like this:
That concludes the trip up. My next post takes a look at the Sideling Hill Cut on I-68 in Maryland


Nice photos, Adam.

Thanks for sharing.

Popular posts from this blog

Old US 101; the San Juan Grade

While researching maps for California State Route 183 I noticed something interesting on the 1935 County Highway maps for San Benito and Monterey County.  From what it appeared it seems that there used to be a state highway running from US 101 south on San Juan Highway, through San Juan Bautista, south over the San Juan Grade to Salinas.  It turns out what I discovered was an a very old alignment of US 101 which was replaced by 1932.

The information relevant to the history of US 101 over the San Juan Grade is as follows:

-  The San Juan Grade was built in 1915 which presumably replaced Old Stage Road from Salinas to San Juan Bautista.  Presumably this was part of alignment adopted as Legislative Route 2 from San Francisco south to San Diego in 1909.  This history can be seen on 1931 edition of the California Highways and Public Works Journal and on

1931 Highways and Public Works Journal

CAhighways on LRN 2

-  By 1926 the San Juan Grade became part of US 101.  The San Jua…

The Tioga Pass Road

Last Summer the Tioga Pass Road over the Sierras in Yosemite National Park opened late due to the heavy snow pack during the previous winter.  Approaching the start of July the Park Service finally had cleared Tioga Pass, I headed up shortly after the 4th of July holiday during a lull in the tourist season.

The Tioga Pass Road runs from the Big Oak Flat Road east to US Route 395.  The Tioga Pass road is largely within the boundary of Yosemite National Park but is also partially on California State Route 120 east of the Tioga Pass entry station to US 395.  The Park Service maintained portion of the Tioga Pass Road serve as a implied connection between the two segments of CA 120.  The Tioga Pass Road is the highest road mountain pass in California with Tioga Pass which lies at 9,945 feet above sea level.

The Tioga Pass Road is very old with the eastern section up Lee Vining Canyon to the Tioga Mine being built in 1883.  The connecting section of the Tioga Pass Road from Big Oak Flat R…

California State Route 49, The Golden Chain Highway (CA 16 north over Yuba Pass to CA 89)

After completing California State Route 124 I took CA 16 to the eastern terminus to start my first Trans-Sierra route; California State Route 49/Golden Chain Highway over Yuba Pass.

As stated I joined CA 49 from the eastern terminus of CA 16 in Amador County.  CA 49 actually begins in Madera County to the south in Oakhurst at CA 41.  CA 49 is about 295 miles long and travels most of the traditional 1849 Gold Rush Country north from Oakhurst to CA 70.  If you want history and old towns then CA 49 is one of the best routes on the West Coast to see both.

To the north of CA 16 the next major junction is Signed County Route E16 in Plymouth which is on Shenandoah Road.  E16 is a 33.2 mile route which travels northeast to US 50. 

Plymouth dates back to the 1850s and is mostly known for a winery that dates back to 1856.  These photos are from Main Street looking west.

CA 49 generally is very rural and doesn't deviate much from when it was first signed back in 1934.  While CA 49 isn'…