Skip to main content

2009 Fall Vacation - Trip to Texas - Day 2 - Photos from Arkansas

The first day of vacation was driving out to Jackson, TN from Raleigh. A little over 10 hours - a nice easy drive.

The second day was the first day of exploration as we traveled from Jackson, TN to Lindale, TX. To break up the trip, we made two stops - the first was to do some hiking at Village Creek State Park in Arkansas the second was to visit the Bill Clinton Birthplace and Museum in Hope, AR.

The day was marred with low overcast skies, an off and on drizzle, a damp humid feeling. It didn't stop us from enjoying the day - but it sure was frustrating.

Village Creek State Park - Entire flickr photo set go here.

We exited off I-40 near Forest City and headed north about 15 miles to Village Creek State Park. The main reason was to break up the trip and since for the most part we were driving through Arkansas - have a chance to at least say that we've spent time there.

Village Creek is a popular Eastern Arkansas park - it is home to an Andy Dye Golf Course, there are a number of cabins, numerous campsites around two lakes, hiking trails (including the best preserved remnants of the Cherokee Trail of Tears within the state).

We hiked the Austell Trail and part of the Old Military Road. The Austell Trail runs from the Visitor's Center to Lake Austell along with running along parts of Crowley's Ridge. The Old Military Road is part of what was the Memphis to Little Rock road which was completed in 1829.

IMG_0973

IMG_0994

IMG_0998

Heading back to I-40 on AR 284 we passed this ravine lined with Kudzu.

IMG_1001

I-40 through Prairie County is as close to ski slalom you can do on an Interstate Highway. The concrete highway is in horrible shape. We saw three cars, and two 18-wheelers pulled over with flat tires through that stretch; it made for the only interesting part in an otherwise rather boring I-40 from Memphis to Little Rock.

We headed down I-30 to Hope. Hope is the childhood home and birthplace of President Bill Clinton. Hope's best days look to be in its past when it was one of the largest cities in Arkansas. Today, there are many empty storefronts, broken down buildings, and the gloomy conditions on this October afternoon only added to the dismal surroundings.

For the entire flickr set head here.

Our first stop was the Hope Visitors Center. It is in the former passenger terminal for the Missouri Pacific Railroad. The visitor center will see more life as Amtrak will be adding a passenger stop in Hope to the Texas Eagle line.

IMG_1004

After looking around the visitor's center - Maggie and I did a brief walk around Hope.

IMG_1003

IMG_1012

IMG_1020

IMG_1024

IMG_1025

We then went to the Bill Clinton Birthplace and Museum which is only a few blocks from Downtown and the Visitor's Center. The grounds include Clinton's childhood home - which was built in 1915 and restored to how it looked in the mid-late 1940's.

The birthplace will soon fall under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service as one of 33 Presidential Historic Sites.

IMG_1032

After touring through the museum, the guide takes you on a brief tour of the home. You are able to tour both floors of the home. And though you can't take photos inside the home, they will gladly take a photo of you anywhere inside the house.

Comments

Jake miller said…
The viewpoints of the forest are wonderful, I definitely like observing all over the globe so much that is why I find travel agents that was acquiring a magnificent encounter in way of lifestyle.

Popular posts from this blog

The Relief Route That Wasn't: The Never Built I-70 Bypass in the Mid-Mon Valley

In June 1963, a small blurb in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette read that The Westmoreland Engineering Company was awarded a $24,060 bid to study the proposed construction of Interstate 70 in Westmoreland and Washington Counties.  The study was to see what the construction and right-of-way costs "...to modernize the existing highway to Interstate requirements within eight months." (1)  This small, non-attributed, three paragraph article came less than a decade after the completion of a four lane highway that linked the Mid-Mon Valley to the Pennsylvania Turnpike. This would be the start of a 15 year process to upgrade and improve Interstate 70 - a process that ultimately never produced a single foot of new highway.

This is the story, albeit brief, of the I-70 that never came about.

Background:
What is now known as Interstate70 from Washington to New Stanton began as a connecting highway for the region to the Pennsylvania Turnpike.  Known as the "Express Highway", construct…

The Many Failed Plans of Pittsburgh's Wabash Bridge and Tunnel

The December 27, 2004 opening of the Wabash Tunnel ended over 70 years of proposals and speculation for the use of the over 100 year old facility.  The tunnel, which is now a reversible roadway that is an alternative route for rush hour traffic, saw many failed plans during the 20th Century.  These plans included options for mass transit, converted and new bridges for vehicles, and other forms of transportation.

Brief History:
Constructed in 1902-04, the Wabash Bridge and Tunnel was planned and financed by rail mogul, Jay Gould.  Gould began his "Battle of the Wabash" with the established railroads of the city in 1890.  He would finally emerge victorious, but during that struggle, Gould would see many setbacks that would eventually result in the railroad's bankruptcy in 1908.  On October 19, 1903, when the two ends of the bridge were to be joined together over the Monongahela River, the 109' bridge collapsed; killing ten men.  Construction would resume four days later …

A look at Pittsburgh's Saw Mill Run Boulevard

Saw Mill Run Boulevard - Pennsylvania State Route 51 - runs through the narrow Saw Mill Run Valley.  It begins at the intersection of Clairton Road and Provost Road at the City of Pittsburgh Line with Brentwood.  It ends at the West End Circle at the entrance to the West End Bridge.  A four lane highway for its the entire length, Saw Mill Run Boulevard consists of interchanges at the South Portal of the Liberty Tubes and with the Parkway West.  It is an expressway from the Parkway to the West End Circle (West End Bypass).  One of the most well known traffic tie-ups in the Pittsburgh area occurs between Maytide Street and PA 88 (Library Road) which is simply known as 'Maytide and 88.'

History:
Saw Mill Run Boulevard was part of the 1928 Allegheny County 'City Beautiful' bond issue.  The bonds resulted in the creation of Saw Mill Run, Ohio River, Allegheny River and Mosside Boulevards. (1)   After the completion of the Liberty Tunnels in 1924, Downtown Pittsburgh was offic…