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Remaining stretch of I-485 will feature three unique types of interchanges

The remaining 5.4 miles of I-485 currently under construction in Mecklenburg County will feature three unique interchanges.  All three are in use elsewhere within the country, but would be the first ones built in the Tar Heel State.

At two of the interchanges, the new designs are considered upgrades (in traffic flow and cost savings) versus what had originally been planned.

The interchange design names are Split Diamond, Diverging Diamond, and Turbine.

Heading East from the current terminus at NC 115, the three new interchange designs run as follows:

The Split Diamond interchange will be located at Prosperity Church Road.  This interchange will consist of two access roads and six roundabouts.

Split Diamond Interchange with Prosperity Church Road (NCDOT)
The Diverging Diamond Interchange (DDI), first used in Missouri, is starting to catch interest in North Carolina.  The interchange design, actually reverses the lanes of traffic on the surface/cross street.  This will be located at the Mallard Creek Road exit on I-485.

This design replaces a planned Single Point Urban Interchange (SPUI) for 485 and Mallard Creek.


We covered a Diverging Diamond Interchange back in October when NCDOT announced it is considering the design on NC 133 where it meets the US 74/76 freeway in Leland.  These two intersections, along with two more on nearby Interstate 85 at NC 73 and Poplar Tent Road, are some of seven prospective locations for this new style of interchange.

Finally, the Turbine - an interchange that has all left turn movements circling around a central bridge in a clockwise direction, creating a seamless movement between the two highways.  This replaces the previously planned four-level stack interchange.  (Similar in design to where I-77 and 485 meet in Southern Mecklenburg County.)

The new "Turbine" interchange at 85/485.  (NCDOT)      
According to NCDOT, this type of interchange will cost less to build and maintain, take up less space, and allow for less interruptions to existing I-85 traffic during construction.


Story Links:
Last Outerbelt juntions to display unique functions ---Charlotte Observer
I-485 Charlotte Outer Loop ---NCDOT

Comments

Froggie said…
NCDOT apparently doesn't see it as such, but I-40/Exit 195 (at NC 109) in Winston-Salem, is very much a split-diamond.
Anonymous said…
Should that be counterclockwise, or am I missing something? (Maybe clockwise in countries that drive on the left...)
Reminds me of my Alexandria Orb proposal:

http://wwwtripwithinthebeltway.blogspot.com/2007/02/alexandria-orb-page-one-news-december.html

http://wwwtripwithinthebeltway.blogspot.com/search/label/Alexandria%20Orb

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